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Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Managing young Douglas-fir and western hemlock found in the catalog.

Managing young Douglas-fir and western hemlock

Alan B. Berg

Managing young Douglas-fir and western hemlock

economics, yield control, and thinning; symposium held June 16-18, 1969. Compiled and edited by Alan B. Berg.

by Alan B. Berg

  • 144 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by School of Forestry, Oregon State University in Corvallis .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir,
  • Western hemlock

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsOregon. State University, Corvallis. School of Forestry
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSD397 D7 B47
    The Physical Object
    Pagination175p.
    Number of Pages175
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18359979M

    Douglas-fir is one of the world's most important and valuable timber trees. It grows across a larger portion of western North America, from 19 to 55 degrees North in latitude, than any other commercially used conifer. Douglas-fir records. Diameter: > 11 1/2 feet (Coos County, Oregon) Height: feet (Little Rock, Washington). A key silvicultural decision in managing young conifer plantations is determining the number and timing of release treatments to control competing vegetation. Three coastal Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) plantations were treated under eight alternative herbicide regimes during the first 5 years after planting to test.

    We compared hydraulic architecture, photosynthesis, and growth in Douglas-fir with that of a shade-tolerant western hemlock. The study was conducted in a site that had been thinned to release suppressed trees, and one that remained unthinned. Release seemed to be constrained initially by photosynthetic capacity in both species. hemlock, western white pine, and western larch are fre-quently grazed Ellen () listed pine, Douglas fir, and spruce in order of decreasing susceptibility to sheep browsing. White fir has been reported to be more readily browsed than Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, or sugar pine Western red cedar is more palatable to browsing than Douglas.

    In western hemlock, released trees had 19% wider tracheids that were approximately the same length as those in suppressed trees. Moisture content was 66% greater in released Douglas-fir and 41% greater in released western hemlock. Wood density decreased by 21% in Douglas-fir trees and by 11% in western hemlock trees released from suppression. Laminated root rot also known as yellow ring rot is caused by the fungal pathogen Phellinus ted root rot is one of the most damaging root disease amongst conifers in northwestern America and true firs, Douglas-fir, Mountain hemlock, and Western hemlock are highly susceptible to infection with P. weirii.A few species of plants such as Western white pine and Lodgepole pine are.


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Managing young Douglas-fir and western hemlock by Alan B. Berg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Managing young Douglas-fir and Western Hemlock: economics, yield control, and thinning Public DepositedAuthor: Carl H. Stoltenberg, Gerald E. Hoyer, Carl A. Newport, Alan B. Berg, Michael Newton, H. Holt, Lyl. Managing young Douglas fir and western hemlock: economics, yield control, and thinning, symposium held JuneAuthor: Alan B Berg ; Oregon State University.

Get this from a library. Management of young growth: Douglas-fir and western hemlock: symposium held June[Alan B Berg; Oregon State University. School of. BERG, Alan B., Ed. Management of Young-growth Douglas-fir and Western Hemlock.

School of For., Oregon State University, Corvallis. Symposium Proc., Vol. 1, $ p. December Thirty-one articles by 23 authors on silvicultural, operational, economic, social, and ecological aspects of young-growth management. Managing Young Douglas-Fir and Western Hemlock LEVELS OF MANAGEMENT INTENSITY Now, let's look at the levels of intensity (Table 1) that could apply to your operations in young-growth management.

I have labeled them "NONE, LOW, INTERMEDIATE, and INTENSIVE," for convenience sake. If your young-growth management is NONE, you have. OF WESTERN HEMLOCK AND DOUGLAS-FIR by Rudolf Kangur INTRODUCTION Snow damage was evaluated in four forest management research areas in mixed stands of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) in the sapling stage and in one area where the stand was entirely western hemlock.

Precommercial thinning (PCT) increases individual tree size and shortens harvest rotation time by affecting the timing and intensity of competitive interactions between trees.

Short-term results from PCT and spacing trials often show that the trade-off for rapid individual tree growth at lower densities is a period of time where trees do not fully occupy the site, and stand yield lags behind.

Two species, with to 2 a 3 cm small cones. Not often in forests, more in gardens --> Hemlock fir. Either Eastern_hemlock or Tsuga_canadensis or Western_hemlock. In the books one is given differences, but in practice it is as good as impossible to tell the Western and Oriental Hemlock species apart.

fir, western hemlock, Pacific silver fir and mountain hemlock series. BERNARD L. KOVALCHIK (Bud) is Area Ecologist in Area II (Wenatchee, Okanogan, and Colville National Forests) and is stationed on the Colville National Forest ( S.

Main, Colville, WA ). He was the primary analyst and author of the Oregon white oak. Douglas-fir is a dimorphic species with two more-or-less distinct forms.

One of these is restricted to the forests of the Pacific slope and the other to those of the Rocky Mountain region. Douglas-fir comprises about 50 percent of the standing timber in the western forests.

It produces more timber than any other American species. Douglas fir buds. Douglas fir new growth. True Fir or Abies spp. There are many firs in our region including Pacific silver fir, grand fir, noble fir, and in the high country, subalpine fir.

All true firs have cones that are erect. Bark on younger trees is often smooth and silvery with blisters that contain sap.

Fir branch sprays often appear flat. Crop Management (–) Forage & Grazinglands (–) Journal of Production Agriculture (–) Urea and Biuret Stimulate Growth of Douglas‐fir and Western Hemlock Seedlings. Correction(s) for this article Donald C. Young. Unocal Science and Technology Div., Brea, CA.

Other Names: Western Hemlock-Spruce, Pacific Hemlock, Coast Hemlock, West Coast Hemlock: Size: Height: 50 to 70 m ( to ft); occasionally grows up to m ( ft).

Trunk diameter: Up to m (9 ft). Identification: Leaves (Needles): Short-stalked, finely toothed, flat, mm long, irregularly spare Cones: Ovoid, short-stalked, thin papery scales; greenish to reddish-purple. Forest Ecology and Management () Forest Ecology and Management Annualized diameter and height growth equations for Pacific Northwest plantation-grown Douglas-fir, western hemlock, and red alder Aaron R.

Weiskittela3*, Sean M. Garber a, Gregory P. Johnson b, Douglas A. Maguire a, Robert A. Monserud. well under a closed canopy. Western hemlock grows in pure stands or mixed at lower levels with Douglas-fir, silver and grand firs, giant arborvitae, redwood, and hardwood and at higher elevations with noble fir, Alaska cedar, mountain hemlock, western, white, and.

Results based on location within the tree are summarized for Douglas-fir and western hemlock in Table 4. The overall Douglas-fir mean tensile Young's modulus and ultimate strength calculated based on testing of specimens was x [sup.6] psi and 9, psi with COVs of and percent, respectively.

Mortality increases steadily in Douglas-fir stands to years old but spread is slower in older stands and it takes many decades for the large old trees to be killed by the fungus.

This is the most serious disease of older Douglas-fir and true fir. Douglas-fir, mountain hemlock, grand fir and white fir are the most susceptible. Shade Tolerant Western hemlock Sitka spruce Englemann spruce Grand fir 10’ x 10’ or spa 10’ – 12’ or spa D + 4 D + 1 Moderately Shade Tolerant Douglas-fir (coastal) 11’ x 11’ or spa 11’ – 13’ or spa D + 5 D + 2 Moderately Intolerant Douglas-fir.

The pattern of vertical stratification in mixed Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugamenziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and western hemlock (Tsugaheterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) stands was documented by observing tree interaction patterns on temporary plots in stands between 35 and 80 years old.

It was found that Douglas-fir predictably dominated the hemlock. 1. Introduction. Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.)Franco) and western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.)Sarg.) are two of the most economically important species in western North America (Hermann and Lavender,Harrington and Shoenholz, ).Although Douglas-fir is preferred for applications requiring strong and stiff wood, both species are widely used.

Regularly monitoring the forest is critical, especially for those that have or will have optimum conditions to attract bear ― highly productive sites, with fast-growing, vigorous trees (Douglas-fir, western hemlock aged 15 to 30 years) — and/or are located in an area with a large bear population or known damage.Physical and Mechanical Properties of Young-Growth Douglas-Fir and Western Hemlock from Western Washington Article (PDF Available) in Forest Products Journal 59(11/12) .We studied understory composition in thinned and unthinned Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.)Franco)/western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.)Sarg.) stands on 28 sites in western Oregon.

These stands had regenerated naturally after timber harvest, 40–70 years before thinning.